Oppo Reno 3 Pro Dual Sim With Official Warranty
Review: 5 - "A masterpiece of literature" by , written on May 4, 2006
I really enjoyed this book. It captures the essential challenge people face as they try make sense of their lives and grow to adulthood.
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Oppo Reno 3 Pro Dual Sim With Official Warranty

Available: In Stock
Rs.60,500.00 Rs.65,000.00

Oppo Reno3 Pro may sound familiar as a phone under that name was released back in December but only for its home market in China. A month later, the handset is finally making its way to international markets but surprisingly, in a slightly different package. To say it's a completely different phone would be an overstatement because there are only few differences in specs but they are key enough to make the end-user experience considerably different.

For one, the global version of Reno3 Pro keeps things simple with a flat display, instead of a curved one like on its Chinese sibling, but adds a second camera on the front. The change to a flat display can be considered as a plus by many, but the extra hole for the second camera looks a bit obtrusive. Still, the AMOLED display on the new phone is excellent, it's one of the phone's key selling point.

Oppo Reno3 Pro specs

  • Body: Glass front (Gorilla Glass 5), polycarbonate back and frame.
  • Screen: 6.5-inch Super AMOLED, 20:9, FHD+ (1080 x 2400px), 405ppi.
  • Rear camera: Primary: 64MP, 1/1.72" sensor size, 0.8µm pixel size, f/1.8 aperture. Ultra wide-angle: 8MP, 1/4” sensor size, 1.4µm pixel size, 13mm, f/2.2. Telephoto: 13MP, 1/3.4” sensor size, 1.0µm pixel size, 2x optical zoom (53mm), f/2.4. Depth sensor: 2MP B/W; 2160p@30fps video recording.
  • Front camera:Primary: 44MP, 1/2.8", f/2.4. 1080p@30fps video recording; Depth sensor: 2MP.
  • Chipset: Mediatek Helio P95 (12 nm): Octa-core (2x2.2 GHz Cortex-A75 & 6x2.0 GHz Cortex-A55), PowerVR GM9446.
  • Memory:  8/256GB versions, expandable via microSD.
  • OS: Android 10; ColorOS 7.
  • Battery: 4,025mAh, VOOC Flash Charge 4.0 30W charging.
  • Connectivity: Dual SIM (4G), Bluetooth 5.0, Wi-Fi a/b/g/n/ac, USB-C; 3.5mm audio jack.
  • Misc: Under-display fingerprint reader, No NFC.

The chipset is also different from the Chinese version and the international version of the Oppo Reno3 Pro is touting the brand new MediaTek P95 chipset. We are yet to see how it stacks against the competition so it will be one intriguing test.

The global model has an upgrade in the camera department, as it's getting a capable 64MP sensor for its main camera. We are yet to see how well this new sensor performs when MediaTek's image signal processor is pulling the strings.

The Reno3 Pro packs a solid 4,000mAh battery and can replenish it fast thanks to the included 30W charger in the box. We also have a full set of camera focal lengths - besides the main cam, there is also an ultra-wide, and a 2x telephoto zoom camera.

It all looks pretty promising on paper, but this segment is particularly sensitive to the product pricing and it's a cut-throat competition these days. The Reno3 Pro will really need to find a way to stand out from the crowd to leave a mark. So let's not waste any more time and get straight to our review.

Unboxing the Oppo Reno3 Pro

The phone comes in a standard package with all the usual user manuals, the compatible 30W VOOC Flash Charge 4.0 charger, the USB-A to USB-C cable and you also get a free transparent silicone case to show off the cool gradient on the back.

Design and ergonomics

Built-wise, the Oppo Reno3 Pro is like every modern smartphone out there - glass on the front and glass on the back held by a frame around the sides. The back panel, however, isn't actual glass. It's polycarbonate along with the side frame, which is glossy too. Maybe that's why the phone feels so light. The front panel is protected by Gorilla Glass 5, though.

Anyway, the back sheet is curved enough to provide comfortable, secure grip and also houses a rather big lump with the quad-camera array in the upper-left corner. The module is big enough to make the phone wobble when placed flat on its back, and by "secure grip," we mean as secure as it can get given that it's a glass sandwich smartphone. All glass sandwich smartphones are slippery. And as for the color - we got the so-called Auroral Blue. It looks cool but attracts a lot of fingerprints, which stay visible. They are easy to wipe off, though.

When you turn the Reno3 Pro around, you will be greeted by a tall 6.4-inch display with a dual punch-hole camera in the upper left corner. Oppo says they made it as small as possible, and we can confirm that this is one of the smallest holes we've seen, but we have a different issue with it. We feel like it's been placed too far from the corner of the display, eating away too much screen real estate. Otherwise, the side bezels, along with the bottom lip, look impressively thin - something you'd normally see on a high-end phone. The earpiece on the top bezel can barely fit in the bezel - it's so thin.

The side frame isn't anything out of the ordinary, but we do have to give credit to Oppo's design team for making the seamless transition of the gradient on the back to the side frame. It's a job well done.

So back to the frame, we find the two separate volume buttons on the left accompanied by the SIM card tray while the right side houses the power button. The latter has a beautiful mint-colored accent. The bottom is a bit different in design - it's slightly recessed, with the USB-C connector in the middle flanked by a 3.5mm audio jack and the loudspeaker grille.

All in all, it's not an unwieldy phone, yet it's not a compact one either. Given the size of the screen, the Reno3 Pro has a decent footprint and doesn't weigh that much (175g). The weight distribution isn't ideal - it's a bit top-heavy, and you will find yourself often reaching for the top part of the phone since it's a tall smartphone, but that's par for the course these days. Our only real complaints remain the positioning of the punch-hole and the big bump on the back.

Bright OLED with dual punch-hole

Until recently, Samsung was one of the few, if not the only, manufacturer to offer high-quality OLED panels to the average consumer, but these days, Chinese OEMs like Oppo love to pamper consumers and you can expect to see at least a few of the phones in their portfolio coming out with Samsung-made AMOLED panels. And the Reno3 Pro is one of those phones.


It features a tall 20:9 Super AMOLED screen with 1080 x 2400px resolution. It appears that this panel boasts exceptionally high maximum brightness easily beating some of the best flagships from 2019. Oppo says the panel can go up to 500 nits at maximum brightness, and in a really bright environment, the screen can boost up to 800 nits. Moreover, small patches on the screen can reach up to 1,200 nits. We weren't able to check if the last claim is true, but given the results we got from our standard test, we have every reason to believe Oppo's claims.

At maximum brightness, we recorded 522 nits, and when Max Auto kicked in, the panel reached the staggering 892 nits. That's really bright, and we doubt you will have any trouble using the phone on a bright, sunny day.

Color accuracy, on the other hand, isn't stellar. Reds, blues, greens, and yellows are off - due to some boosting - and whites and grays appear a bit blue-ish. The average dE2000 turned out to be 4.5, which suggests the screen has undergone some color calibration at the factory, but we've seen better results from calibrated phones. You can use the color temperature slider to shift the white point closer to the D65 standard to tame those bluish whites and grays but other than that, the phone doesn't offer any additional color presets for the display.

Battery life

It appears that 4,000 mAh has become the standard go-to capacity for midrange phones these days so we can't say the Reno3 Pro's 4,025 mAh battery is anything special in that respect. However, that combined with the power-efficient 12nm Helio P95 chipset, has resulted in downright impressive endurance from this phone. The device posted excellent screen-on scores in our web browsing and video playback scenarios while the screen-off scores were a tad lower but not far off from excellent. With a total score of 104h, the Oppo Reno3 Pro will probably provide up to two days of battery endurance with normal usage.Our battery tests were automated thanks to SmartViser, using its viSer App. The endurance rating above denotes how long a single battery charge will last you if you use the Oppo Reno3 Pro for an hour each of telephony, web browsing, and video playback daily. We've established this usage pattern so that our battery results are comparable across devices in the most common day-to-day tasks. The battery testing procedure is described in detail in case you're interested in the nitty-gritty. You can check out our complete battery test table, where you can see how all of the smartphones we've tested will compare under your own typical use.

Charging times are just as impressive. The 4,025 mAh battery can be filled from flat in just 1:12h, showing 67% at the 30-minute mark, which is quite good. The VOOC Flash Charge 4.0-compliant brick in the box is rated at 30W (5A/6V) and makes it one of the fastest chargers in the price range.

The brand new ColorOS 7 based on Android 10

This is our first encounter with Oppo's new UI - ColorOS 7. As Oppo promised, it's a bit more in line with the stock-ish look of Android, but it still offers tons of customization options. No matter how you look at it, though, it's still one of the "heavy" Android skins so it isn't targeted at stock Android fans, that's for sure.


Anyway, there's nothing special about the home screen itself, but you can still opt for the app drawer if you are a fan of that. Otherwise, the so-called Standard Mode is active, displaying all of the installed apps on the home screen. Speaking of apps, the icons are highly-customizable, and you can tinker with the settings all you want. There are a couple of preset styles, but you can alter each one of them by adjusting the style of the corners, the roundness of the icons, the foreground, and the icon style itself. We find the feature pretty neat and easy to use too.

  
Customizable icons

From the very same menu, you can also adjust the speed of the app animation and also use the swipe down gesture on the home screen to bring down the notification shade instead of reaching all the way up to the notification bar.

Speaking of the notification shade, it hasn't been reworked completely, but the icon style of the quick toggles has been altered a bit. Instead of circles, you get oval-shaped square and gone are the different colors for the toggles - they are all green now when it's active. What we found annoying is that dismissing a notification only works when swiping the card left or right - it can't work in both directions. Strangely enough, you can't change the accent color, either. It's always green, even with the system-wide Dark Mode enabled. Which, by the way, also lets you enforce Dark Mode on third-party apps too. That last bit is still 'In beta' as it was in ColorOS 6.

   
Lock screen, Home screen, notification shade, recent apps menu

The general settings menu has also undergone some changes - all the sub-menus get their icons, which are different in shape and colors, so it's easier to navigate and find what you want.

Too bad that some of the features are buried in some sub-menus which are less than logically named. For example, navigation gestures can be found under Convenience tools. And to make things even more complicated, the sub-menu is called Navigation Buttons.

For navigation, you get the option between the standard Android 10 navigation gestures (Swipe Gestures from Both Sides), the good old virtual buttons and More will take you to Oppo's Swipe-up gestures. They are almost the same as Google's default navigation gestures but instead of swiping from the left or right bezel to go back, you can swipe up from the left or right side of the bottom lip.

  
General settings menu

  
Navigation options

Having the option for choosing between Oppo's own gestures and the default Android 10 ones is nice and user-friendly. In our opinion, the stock Android 10 gestures are better as they require less finger gymnastics.

In the Display and Brightness sub-menu you can find the so-called Flicker-Free Eye Care mode, or in other words, DC dimming. It's supposed to reduce the invisible flickering inherent to OLED panels and thus reduce the eye fatigue for people who may be sensitive to it.

Eye Care, on the other hand, reduces the blue light emissions and comes in handy at night before going to bed. Color temperature adjustment, font size, font style, display size and themes are also adjusted in this menu.

 Display menu

The fingerprint and facial recognition setup is pretty straightforward too, but we can't miss praising the under-display fingerprint performance. Given that the display illuminates the fingerprint area in white, we are led to believe that the phone uses the latest generation Goodix optical fingerprint scanner. The latter is also found on OnePlus' latest 7T-series smartphones and other high-end Oppo handsets.

Unfortunately, the fingerprint reader implementation on the Oppo Reno3 Pro is ever so slightly slower than what we've experienced on the higher-end models and we suspect the slower chipset is the one to blame. After all, OnePlus and the Oppo flagships make use of the significantly more powerful Snapdragon 855+ chip.

In any case, you will find the fingerprint reader fast, reliable and accurate in 90% of the time.

 
Biometrics menu

Unfotunately, when the fingerprint reader area lights up on the lockscreen, the backlighting is gray and hard to see in a bright environment. Also, the fingerprint prompt will light up only when you move the phone and you can't wake it up with say, a tap on the screen. So if you'd like to unlock the phone while it is placed flat on its back on the desk, your only option is to use the double-tap lockscreen gesture which will light up the entire screen rather than just the fingerprint reader area.


Speaking of screen-off gestures, there are a couple of Oppo's well-known gestures available on the Reno3 Pro as well. You can draw different letters on the locked screen to launch an app or use the music control gestures to control your music player. The so-called Auto Switch to Ear Receiver gesture is particularly helpful if you use Bluetooth devices often. The feature allows you to pick up your phone normally without switching to the earpiece manually. Meaning, if the phone is connected to your Bluetooth speaker or headphones, it would normally answer on the connected device, but when you pick up the phone and put it close to your ear, the phone will know that you want to take your call using the earpiece. It works great, and we find that one to be exceptionally useful.

   
Screen-off gestures and other motion and gesture-related features

Some of the other noteworthy features include things like a high-performance mode in the battery sub-menu, a dedicated split-screen sub-menu for all the related settings and a Game Space feature that lets you focus on the game while managing notifications and other distractions.

ColorOS 7 is packed with tons of features while doing pretty well in terms of daily performance. Despite the heavy customization, we found that the Helio P95 chipset feels quite smooth and we didn't notice any hiccups or hangs.

Performance

The handset employs the recently released MediaTek P95 chipset, which isn't exactly new as it's based on the already familiar P90 chipset with a small tweak in the GPU department. It is said to offer a 6% boost in performance, which leads us to believe that it's merely overclocked.

Aside from that, the chipset is still using an octa-core CPU with 2x Cortex-A75 cores running at 2.2GHz, and 6x Cortex-A55 clocked at 2.0GHz. The GPU is PowerVR GM9446. And, of course, the whole platform is manufactured on the 12nm node.

Our particular review unit is also equipped with 8GB of RAM and 256GB of internal storage, which can be expanded using a microSD card.

With all being said, we expect the chipset to perform almost identically to other phones running the Helio P90 chipset so here's what the synthetic benchmarks have to say about it.

A quad-camera setup with all the essentials

Update 16.03.2020: Since we've published the review, a final update came to the phone and it was focused mainly on the camera. We've updated the camera section with the new samples and edited the text to reflect our findings including the camera improvements.

The Oppo Reno3 Pro is fully equipped with all the essentials one would ask for - a standard Quad-Bayer main camera, an ultra-wide lens, a telephoto cam, and an additional 2MP black and white sensor. The purpose of the latter isn't exactly clear but we suspect Oppo is using this one for depth information. You can't, however, shoot with it.


So the main camera consists of a 64MP sensor pixel-binning down to 16MP actual images. The pixel size is 0.8µm (1.6µm effective pixel size), the sensor size is 1/1.72" while the lens offers an f/1.8 aperture. The telephoto unit uses a 13MP sensor coupled with an f/2.4 aperture, whereas the ultra-wide cam has 8MP resolution and captures a 119.9-degree field of view.

The front duo of cameras has an unusual 44MP main sensor snapping 40MP by default while the second camera is just there for depth sensing. This should, in theory, help produce better portrait selfies.

Camera menus

The default camera app is familiar but doesn't seem to have that many features. The essentials, aside from the standard Photo mode and the Night mode, are there, though. The Pro mode gives you all the freedom to tinker with ISO, shutter speed, white balance, manual focus, and exposure. And you can do that with all three focal lengths too.

     Camera menus

The additional camera settings can be found in the hamburger menu in the upper-right corner giving you control over video resolution, AI Scene recognition, gestures, etc.

Daylight samples

The daylight samples all look really good. In fact, we are particularly impressed with the dynamic range the main camera offers, and it's good enough to challenge even top-tier smartphones. Colors are punchy, yet relatively accurate instead of being overly-saturated. Detail is excellent, noise is virtually non-existent and contrast is great. There's some edge softness in all of the photos but it's not something you should worry about.

    Main camera daylight samples

Overall, the photos are looking great and if you only check out your photos on the phone's screen, you'd be delighted with the results. The wide dynamic range really makes these shots.

The ultra-wide camera is also capable of capturing some good daylight stills. Naturally, the level of detail is considerably lower compared to the primary camera, but the rendition seems similar even though the dynamic range is just a tad less impressive and colors are way more saturated. This type of processing may seem more appealing to most users with the lively colors. This camera also provides superb geometric lens correction.

 
 
Ultra-wide camera daylight samples

It's apparent that Oppo has tried to maintain consistency with all of its cameras in terms of overall rendition so you'd get similar looks from the telephoto, ultra-wide and normal cameras. The telephoto camera offers good amount of detail, sharpness, nice contrast and punchy colors, and excellent dynamic range - although still just a little less impressive compared to the main unit. And as we've noticed with previously reviewed Realme smartphones, the telephoto camera outputs 12MP images instead of the advertised 13MP.

   
Telephoto camera daylight samples

Low-light samples

To be honest, the nighttime pictures aren't the best ones we've seen. The performance isn't very consistent, we often got blurry photos, the ones that are okay are a bit on the soft side, and there are visible noise patches. Uneven sharpness, mainly in the poorly-lit sections, is another issue we've noticed, perhaps due to imperfect image stacking. The dynamic range, on the other hand, seemed adequate and gave us a good reason to recommend against using the Night mode  

Main camera low-light 

The Night mode adds oversharpening halos to the scene and makes the photos look softer in general. Worst of all, it looks as if the software has taken several low-resolution photos, the image stacking algorithm used them for the final image, and then they were upscaled to 16MP. There are traces of upscaling on straight lines, and the detail is far from the level of the regular photos. The only things you stand to gain from using the Night mode are the punchier colors and the restored shadows but we aren't sure if the trade-off is worth it.

    
Main camera Night mode 

There's also the Ultra Night mode that triggers automatically when the software detects exceptionally dark environments. Generally, photos look a bit softer than usual but it does make a difference in extremely low environments. Here are a couple of samples.

Additionally, the software offers a Tripod Night mode that works with even longer exposures if you have a tripod with you.

  Main camera Ultra Night mode 

Our stance on using the Night mode, however, takes a 180-degree turn when we talk about the ultra-wide camera. As you can see for yourself, the normal photos by the ultra-wide are soft, overexposed and noisy - downright unusable. But when you turn on the Night mode, the stills look as if they are taken with a completely different camera. There's a lot more sharpness, higher amount of detail in the shadows and highlights and contrast seems to be way better.

  
  
Ultra-wide camera low-light samples: Normal • Night mode • Normal • Night mode • Normal • Night mode

Finally, we get to the telephoto camera. Unless it's really dark, the software will opt for using the real telephoto camera - kudos for that. The processing is quite similar to the main camera, and we have the same complaints about the telephoto. General softness and noisy patches although the amount of resolved detail is okay for a telephoto camera in the dark. The Night mode will make matters worse as it will soften the images further, although it restores some shadows here and there.

  
  Telephoto camera low-light samples: Normal • Night mode • Normal • Night mode • Normal • Night mode

And here's an example of a cropped out 2x zoom with and without Night mode.

 
Cropped out 2x zoom from the main camera

You can head off to our photo compare tool to do some more pixel peeping and compare the Oppo Reno3 Pro performance to every other smartphone we've tested.

  
Oppo Reno3 Pro against the Realme X2 Pro and Redmi K20 Pro in our Photo compare tool

Selfies

Despite being 44MP camera, the camera app defaults to 40MP resolution for selfies unless you specifically activate the 44MP mode toggle in the viewfinder.

Surprisingly, we couldn't spot any significant differences between the 40MP and 44MP photos. Both look pretty sharp if you hit the sweet spot of the camera's fixed focus distance. You can also expect natural skin tone, punchy colors and wide dynamic range. However, the latter seems to be an issue with the portrait selfies. Which, by the way, don't appear to have stellar edge detection despite the secondary depth-sensing camera. It seems like the software could have done the job without the help of a depth-sensing camera and thus making the punch-hole smaller on the front.

  
  
Selfie samples: Normal • Portrait • Normal • Portrait • Normal • Portrait

 
 
Selfie samples: 40MP • 44MP • 40MP • 44MP

There's also a selfie Night mode that appears to be more than adequate. It softens the selfies a little but can take photos in quite dim conditions - including extremely dark rooms. It does a really good job of bringing out details from the shadows. The first two photos are under dim lighting and the last two are in a really dark room.

  
Selfie Night mode: Normal • Night mode • Normal • Night mode

Portraits

The edge detection isn't stellar but you do get good dynamic range, nice contrast, natural-looking skin and a good amount of detail. You can see some of the mistakes the algorithm made with stills with more challenging background but in other situations, the bokeh-like effect is looking pretty good.

 
 
Portrait samples

Video recording

The handset is capable of recording up to 2160p@30fps videos and up to 720@240fps slow-motion videos. Of course, there is some EIS going on if you go for 1080p@30fps videos but 4K lacks one. Instead, Oppo is offering the Ultra Steady and Ultra Steady Pro video modes for gimbal-like stabilization but we will talk more about that later.

Now, let's take a look at the 4K recording. Colors may look a bit desaturated at first, but they are also closer to real-life. Sharpness is really good, except for the edge softness on the left. There's also some noise in uniform areas. Contrast and dynamic range, on the other hand, are good.

The 1080p video processing is similar but the noise is slightly more apparent.

Video recording using the telephoto and the ultra-wide cameras isn't an option but by tapping on the 2x zoom button, you will be recording a cropped out clip from the main camera in 4K resolution. And the end, the result isn't bad too. Expect the exact same processing as above.

As far as stabilization goes, we already pointed out that EIS doesn't work in 2160p mode as you can see for yourself.

Tapping on the Ultra Steady icon will significantly narrow the field of view because there's some extreme cropping at play here to reduce the shakiness by cutting out the excess from all sides. The Ultra Steady video is recorded using the main 64MP camera and the result is pretty impressive. Aside from the loss in detail, which is something you'd expect, the video looks very good.

There's also a small toggle in the lower-left corner of the viewfinder, which switches to Ultra Steady Pro. You will immediately notice the wider field of view and the different processing - colors are punchier and the contrast is a bit higher. That's because the phone uses the ultra-wide camera for the Ultra Steady Pro mode. Stabilization isn't as good but you may find it more appropriate if you don't need extreme stabilization. Oh, and both Ultra Steady modes are capped at 1080p quality

Oppo Reno3 Pro may sound familiar as a phone under that name was released back in December but only for its home market in China. A month later, the handset is finally making its way to international markets but surprisingly, in a slightly different package. To say it's a completely different phone would be an overstatement because there are only few differences in specs but they are key enough to make the end-user experience considerably different.

For one, the global version of Reno3 Pro keeps things simple with a flat display, instead of a curved one like on its Chinese sibling, but adds a second camera on the front. The change to a flat display can be considered as a plus by many, but the extra hole for the second camera looks a bit obtrusive. Still, the AMOLED display on the new phone is excellent, it's one of the phone's key selling point.

Oppo Reno3 Pro specs

  • Body: Glass front (Gorilla Glass 5), polycarbonate back and frame.
  • Screen: 6.5-inch Super AMOLED, 20:9, FHD+ (1080 x 2400px), 405ppi.
  • Rear camera: Primary: 64MP, 1/1.72" sensor size, 0.8µm pixel size, f/1.8 aperture. Ultra wide-angle: 8MP, 1/4” sensor size, 1.4µm pixel size, 13mm, f/2.2. Telephoto: 13MP, 1/3.4” sensor size, 1.0µm pixel size, 2x optical zoom (53mm), f/2.4. Depth sensor: 2MP B/W; 2160p@30fps video recording.
  • Front camera:Primary: 44MP, 1/2.8", f/2.4. 1080p@30fps video recording; Depth sensor: 2MP.
  • Chipset: Mediatek Helio P95 (12 nm): Octa-core (2x2.2 GHz Cortex-A75 & 6x2.0 GHz Cortex-A55), PowerVR GM9446.
  • Memory:  8/256GB versions, expandable via microSD.
  • OS: Android 10; ColorOS 7.
  • Battery: 4,025mAh, VOOC Flash Charge 4.0 30W charging.
  • Connectivity: Dual SIM (4G), Bluetooth 5.0, Wi-Fi a/b/g/n/ac, USB-C; 3.5mm audio jack.
  • Misc: Under-display fingerprint reader, No NFC.

The chipset is also different from the Chinese version and the international version of the Oppo Reno3 Pro is touting the brand new MediaTek P95 chipset. We are yet to see how it stacks against the competition so it will be one intriguing test.

The global model has an upgrade in the camera department, as it's getting a capable 64MP sensor for its main camera. We are yet to see how well this new sensor performs when MediaTek's image signal processor is pulling the strings.

The Reno3 Pro packs a solid 4,000mAh battery and can replenish it fast thanks to the included 30W charger in the box. We also have a full set of camera focal lengths - besides the main cam, there is also an ultra-wide, and a 2x telephoto zoom camera.

It all looks pretty promising on paper, but this segment is particularly sensitive to the product pricing and it's a cut-throat competition these days. The Reno3 Pro will really need to find a way to stand out from the crowd to leave a mark. So let's not waste any more time and get straight to our review.

Unboxing the Oppo Reno3 Pro

The phone comes in a standard package with all the usual user manuals, the compatible 30W VOOC Flash Charge 4.0 charger, the USB-A to USB-C cable and you also get a free transparent silicone case to show off the cool gradient on the back.

Design and ergonomics

Built-wise, the Oppo Reno3 Pro is like every modern smartphone out there - glass on the front and glass on the back held by a frame around the sides. The back panel, however, isn't actual glass. It's polycarbonate along with the side frame, which is glossy too. Maybe that's why the phone feels so light. The front panel is protected by Gorilla Glass 5, though.

Anyway, the back sheet is curved enough to provide comfortable, secure grip and also houses a rather big lump with the quad-camera array in the upper-left corner. The module is big enough to make the phone wobble when placed flat on its back, and by "secure grip," we mean as secure as it can get given that it's a glass sandwich smartphone. All glass sandwich smartphones are slippery. And as for the color - we got the so-called Auroral Blue. It looks cool but attracts a lot of fingerprints, which stay visible. They are easy to wipe off, though.

When you turn the Reno3 Pro around, you will be greeted by a tall 6.4-inch display with a dual punch-hole camera in the upper left corner. Oppo says they made it as small as possible, and we can confirm that this is one of the smallest holes we've seen, but we have a different issue with it. We feel like it's been placed too far from the corner of the display, eating away too much screen real estate. Otherwise, the side bezels, along with the bottom lip, look impressively thin - something you'd normally see on a high-end phone. The earpiece on the top bezel can barely fit in the bezel - it's so thin.

The side frame isn't anything out of the ordinary, but we do have to give credit to Oppo's design team for making the seamless transition of the gradient on the back to the side frame. It's a job well done.

So back to the frame, we find the two separate volume buttons on the left accompanied by the SIM card tray while the right side houses the power button. The latter has a beautiful mint-colored accent. The bottom is a bit different in design - it's slightly recessed, with the USB-C connector in the middle flanked by a 3.5mm audio jack and the loudspeaker grille.

All in all, it's not an unwieldy phone, yet it's not a compact one either. Given the size of the screen, the Reno3 Pro has a decent footprint and doesn't weigh that much (175g). The weight distribution isn't ideal - it's a bit top-heavy, and you will find yourself often reaching for the top part of the phone since it's a tall smartphone, but that's par for the course these days. Our only real complaints remain the positioning of the punch-hole and the big bump on the back.

Bright OLED with dual punch-hole

Until recently, Samsung was one of the few, if not the only, manufacturer to offer high-quality OLED panels to the average consumer, but these days, Chinese OEMs like Oppo love to pamper consumers and you can expect to see at least a few of the phones in their portfolio coming out with Samsung-made AMOLED panels. And the Reno3 Pro is one of those phones.


It features a tall 20:9 Super AMOLED screen with 1080 x 2400px resolution. It appears that this panel boasts exceptionally high maximum brightness easily beating some of the best flagships from 2019. Oppo says the panel can go up to 500 nits at maximum brightness, and in a really bright environment, the screen can boost up to 800 nits. Moreover, small patches on the screen can reach up to 1,200 nits. We weren't able to check if the last claim is true, but given the results we got from our standard test, we have every reason to believe Oppo's claims.

At maximum brightness, we recorded 522 nits, and when Max Auto kicked in, the panel reached the staggering 892 nits. That's really bright, and we doubt you will have any trouble using the phone on a bright, sunny day.

Color accuracy, on the other hand, isn't stellar. Reds, blues, greens, and yellows are off - due to some boosting - and whites and grays appear a bit blue-ish. The average dE2000 turned out to be 4.5, which suggests the screen has undergone some color calibration at the factory, but we've seen better results from calibrated phones. You can use the color temperature slider to shift the white point closer to the D65 standard to tame those bluish whites and grays but other than that, the phone doesn't offer any additional color presets for the display.

Battery life

It appears that 4,000 mAh has become the standard go-to capacity for midrange phones these days so we can't say the Reno3 Pro's 4,025 mAh battery is anything special in that respect. However, that combined with the power-efficient 12nm Helio P95 chipset, has resulted in downright impressive endurance from this phone. The device posted excellent screen-on scores in our web browsing and video playback scenarios while the screen-off scores were a tad lower but not far off from excellent. With a total score of 104h, the Oppo Reno3 Pro will probably provide up to two days of battery endurance with normal usage.Our battery tests were automated thanks to SmartViser, using its viSer App. The endurance rating above denotes how long a single battery charge will last you if you use the Oppo Reno3 Pro for an hour each of telephony, web browsing, and video playback daily. We've established this usage pattern so that our battery results are comparable across devices in the most common day-to-day tasks. The battery testing procedure is described in detail in case you're interested in the nitty-gritty. You can check out our complete battery test table, where you can see how all of the smartphones we've tested will compare under your own typical use.

Charging times are just as impressive. The 4,025 mAh battery can be filled from flat in just 1:12h, showing 67% at the 30-minute mark, which is quite good. The VOOC Flash Charge 4.0-compliant brick in the box is rated at 30W (5A/6V) and makes it one of the fastest chargers in the price range.

The brand new ColorOS 7 based on Android 10

This is our first encounter with Oppo's new UI - ColorOS 7. As Oppo promised, it's a bit more in line with the stock-ish look of Android, but it still offers tons of customization options. No matter how you look at it, though, it's still one of the "heavy" Android skins so it isn't targeted at stock Android fans, that's for sure.


Anyway, there's nothing special about the home screen itself, but you can still opt for the app drawer if you are a fan of that. Otherwise, the so-called Standard Mode is active, displaying all of the installed apps on the home screen. Speaking of apps, the icons are highly-customizable, and you can tinker with the settings all you want. There are a couple of preset styles, but you can alter each one of them by adjusting the style of the corners, the roundness of the icons, the foreground, and the icon style itself. We find the feature pretty neat and easy to use too.

  
Customizable icons

From the very same menu, you can also adjust the speed of the app animation and also use the swipe down gesture on the home screen to bring down the notification shade instead of reaching all the way up to the notification bar.

Speaking of the notification shade, it hasn't been reworked completely, but the icon style of the quick toggles has been altered a bit. Instead of circles, you get oval-shaped square and gone are the different colors for the toggles - they are all green now when it's active. What we found annoying is that dismissing a notification only works when swiping the card left or right - it can't work in both directions. Strangely enough, you can't change the accent color, either. It's always green, even with the system-wide Dark Mode enabled. Which, by the way, also lets you enforce Dark Mode on third-party apps too. That last bit is still 'In beta' as it was in ColorOS 6.

   
Lock screen, Home screen, notification shade, recent apps menu

The general settings menu has also undergone some changes - all the sub-menus get their icons, which are different in shape and colors, so it's easier to navigate and find what you want.

Too bad that some of the features are buried in some sub-menus which are less than logically named. For example, navigation gestures can be found under Convenience tools. And to make things even more complicated, the sub-menu is called Navigation Buttons.

For navigation, you get the option between the standard Android 10 navigation gestures (Swipe Gestures from Both Sides), the good old virtual buttons and More will take you to Oppo's Swipe-up gestures. They are almost the same as Google's default navigation gestures but instead of swiping from the left or right bezel to go back, you can swipe up from the left or right side of the bottom lip.

  
General settings menu

  
Navigation options

Having the option for choosing between Oppo's own gestures and the default Android 10 ones is nice and user-friendly. In our opinion, the stock Android 10 gestures are better as they require less finger gymnastics.

In the Display and Brightness sub-menu you can find the so-called Flicker-Free Eye Care mode, or in other words, DC dimming. It's supposed to reduce the invisible flickering inherent to OLED panels and thus reduce the eye fatigue for people who may be sensitive to it.

Eye Care, on the other hand, reduces the blue light emissions and comes in handy at night before going to bed. Color temperature adjustment, font size, font style, display size and themes are also adjusted in this menu.

 Display menu

The fingerprint and facial recognition setup is pretty straightforward too, but we can't miss praising the under-display fingerprint performance. Given that the display illuminates the fingerprint area in white, we are led to believe that the phone uses the latest generation Goodix optical fingerprint scanner. The latter is also found on OnePlus' latest 7T-series smartphones and other high-end Oppo handsets.

Unfortunately, the fingerprint reader implementation on the Oppo Reno3 Pro is ever so slightly slower than what we've experienced on the higher-end models and we suspect the slower chipset is the one to blame. After all, OnePlus and the Oppo flagships make use of the significantly more powerful Snapdragon 855+ chip.

In any case, you will find the fingerprint reader fast, reliable and accurate in 90% of the time.

 
Biometrics menu

Unfotunately, when the fingerprint reader area lights up on the lockscreen, the backlighting is gray and hard to see in a bright environment. Also, the fingerprint prompt will light up only when you move the phone and you can't wake it up with say, a tap on the screen. So if you'd like to unlock the phone while it is placed flat on its back on the desk, your only option is to use the double-tap lockscreen gesture which will light up the entire screen rather than just the fingerprint reader area.


Speaking of screen-off gestures, there are a couple of Oppo's well-known gestures available on the Reno3 Pro as well. You can draw different letters on the locked screen to launch an app or use the music control gestures to control your music player. The so-called Auto Switch to Ear Receiver gesture is particularly helpful if you use Bluetooth devices often. The feature allows you to pick up your phone normally without switching to the earpiece manually. Meaning, if the phone is connected to your Bluetooth speaker or headphones, it would normally answer on the connected device, but when you pick up the phone and put it close to your ear, the phone will know that you want to take your call using the earpiece. It works great, and we find that one to be exceptionally useful.

   
Screen-off gestures and other motion and gesture-related features

Some of the other noteworthy features include things like a high-performance mode in the battery sub-menu, a dedicated split-screen sub-menu for all the related settings and a Game Space feature that lets you focus on the game while managing notifications and other distractions.

ColorOS 7 is packed with tons of features while doing pretty well in terms of daily performance. Despite the heavy customization, we found that the Helio P95 chipset feels quite smooth and we didn't notice any hiccups or hangs.

Performance

The handset employs the recently released MediaTek P95 chipset, which isn't exactly new as it's based on the already familiar P90 chipset with a small tweak in the GPU department. It is said to offer a 6% boost in performance, which leads us to believe that it's merely overclocked.

Aside from that, the chipset is still using an octa-core CPU with 2x Cortex-A75 cores running at 2.2GHz, and 6x Cortex-A55 clocked at 2.0GHz. The GPU is PowerVR GM9446. And, of course, the whole platform is manufactured on the 12nm node.

Our particular review unit is also equipped with 8GB of RAM and 256GB of internal storage, which can be expanded using a microSD card.

With all being said, we expect the chipset to perform almost identically to other phones running the Helio P90 chipset so here's what the synthetic benchmarks have to say about it.

A quad-camera setup with all the essentials

Update 16.03.2020: Since we've published the review, a final update came to the phone and it was focused mainly on the camera. We've updated the camera section with the new samples and edited the text to reflect our findings including the camera improvements.

The Oppo Reno3 Pro is fully equipped with all the essentials one would ask for - a standard Quad-Bayer main camera, an ultra-wide lens, a telephoto cam, and an additional 2MP black and white sensor. The purpose of the latter isn't exactly clear but we suspect Oppo is using this one for depth information. You can't, however, shoot with it.


So the main camera consists of a 64MP sensor pixel-binning down to 16MP actual images. The pixel size is 0.8µm (1.6µm effective pixel size), the sensor size is 1/1.72" while the lens offers an f/1.8 aperture. The telephoto unit uses a 13MP sensor coupled with an f/2.4 aperture, whereas the ultra-wide cam has 8MP resolution and captures a 119.9-degree field of view.

The front duo of cameras has an unusual 44MP main sensor snapping 40MP by default while the second camera is just there for depth sensing. This should, in theory, help produce better portrait selfies.

Camera menus

The default camera app is familiar but doesn't seem to have that many features. The essentials, aside from the standard Photo mode and the Night mode, are there, though. The Pro mode gives you all the freedom to tinker with ISO, shutter speed, white balance, manual focus, and exposure. And you can do that with all three focal lengths too.

     Camera menus

The additional camera settings can be found in the hamburger menu in the upper-right corner giving you control over video resolution, AI Scene recognition, gestures, etc.

Daylight samples

The daylight samples all look really good. In fact, we are particularly impressed with the dynamic range the main camera offers, and it's good enough to challenge even top-tier smartphones. Colors are punchy, yet relatively accurate instead of being overly-saturated. Detail is excellent, noise is virtually non-existent and contrast is great. There's some edge softness in all of the photos but it's not something you should worry about.

    Main camera daylight samples

Overall, the photos are looking great and if you only check out your photos on the phone's screen, you'd be delighted with the results. The wide dynamic range really makes these shots.

The ultra-wide camera is also capable of capturing some good daylight stills. Naturally, the level of detail is considerably lower compared to the primary camera, but the rendition seems similar even though the dynamic range is just a tad less impressive and colors are way more saturated. This type of processing may seem more appealing to most users with the lively colors. This camera also provides superb geometric lens correction.

 
 
Ultra-wide camera daylight samples

It's apparent that Oppo has tried to maintain consistency with all of its cameras in terms of overall rendition so you'd get similar looks from the telephoto, ultra-wide and normal cameras. The telephoto camera offers good amount of detail, sharpness, nice contrast and punchy colors, and excellent dynamic range - although still just a little less impressive compared to the main unit. And as we've noticed with previously reviewed Realme smartphones, the telephoto camera outputs 12MP images instead of the advertised 13MP.

   
Telephoto camera daylight samples

Low-light samples

To be honest, the nighttime pictures aren't the best ones we've seen. The performance isn't very consistent, we often got blurry photos, the ones that are okay are a bit on the soft side, and there are visible noise patches. Uneven sharpness, mainly in the poorly-lit sections, is another issue we've noticed, perhaps due to imperfect image stacking. The dynamic range, on the other hand, seemed adequate and gave us a good reason to recommend against using the Night mode  

Main camera low-light 

The Night mode adds oversharpening halos to the scene and makes the photos look softer in general. Worst of all, it looks as if the software has taken several low-resolution photos, the image stacking algorithm used them for the final image, and then they were upscaled to 16MP. There are traces of upscaling on straight lines, and the detail is far from the level of the regular photos. The only things you stand to gain from using the Night mode are the punchier colors and the restored shadows but we aren't sure if the trade-off is worth it.

    
Main camera Night mode 

There's also the Ultra Night mode that triggers automatically when the software detects exceptionally dark environments. Generally, photos look a bit softer than usual but it does make a difference in extremely low environments. Here are a couple of samples.

Additionally, the software offers a Tripod Night mode that works with even longer exposures if you have a tripod with you.

  Main camera Ultra Night mode 

Our stance on using the Night mode, however, takes a 180-degree turn when we talk about the ultra-wide camera. As you can see for yourself, the normal photos by the ultra-wide are soft, overexposed and noisy - downright unusable. But when you turn on the Night mode, the stills look as if they are taken with a completely different camera. There's a lot more sharpness, higher amount of detail in the shadows and highlights and contrast seems to be way better.

  
  
Ultra-wide camera low-light samples: Normal • Night mode • Normal • Night mode • Normal • Night mode

Finally, we get to the telephoto camera. Unless it's really dark, the software will opt for using the real telephoto camera - kudos for that. The processing is quite similar to the main camera, and we have the same complaints about the telephoto. General softness and noisy patches although the amount of resolved detail is okay for a telephoto camera in the dark. The Night mode will make matters worse as it will soften the images further, although it restores some shadows here and there.

  
  Telephoto camera low-light samples: Normal • Night mode • Normal • Night mode • Normal • Night mode

And here's an example of a cropped out 2x zoom with and without Night mode.

 
Cropped out 2x zoom from the main camera

You can head off to our photo compare tool to do some more pixel peeping and compare the Oppo Reno3 Pro performance to every other smartphone we've tested.

  
Oppo Reno3 Pro against the Realme X2 Pro and Redmi K20 Pro in our Photo compare tool

Selfies

Despite being 44MP camera, the camera app defaults to 40MP resolution for selfies unless you specifically activate the 44MP mode toggle in the viewfinder.

Surprisingly, we couldn't spot any significant differences between the 40MP and 44MP photos. Both look pretty sharp if you hit the sweet spot of the camera's fixed focus distance. You can also expect natural skin tone, punchy colors and wide dynamic range. However, the latter seems to be an issue with the portrait selfies. Which, by the way, don't appear to have stellar edge detection despite the secondary depth-sensing camera. It seems like the software could have done the job without the help of a depth-sensing camera and thus making the punch-hole smaller on the front.

  
  
Selfie samples: Normal • Portrait • Normal • Portrait • Normal • Portrait

 
 
Selfie samples: 40MP • 44MP • 40MP • 44MP

There's also a selfie Night mode that appears to be more than adequate. It softens the selfies a little but can take photos in quite dim conditions - including extremely dark rooms. It does a really good job of bringing out details from the shadows. The first two photos are under dim lighting and the last two are in a really dark room.

  
Selfie Night mode: Normal • Night mode • Normal • Night mode

Portraits

The edge detection isn't stellar but you do get good dynamic range, nice contrast, natural-looking skin and a good amount of detail. You can see some of the mistakes the algorithm made with stills with more challenging background but in other situations, the bokeh-like effect is looking pretty good.

 
 
Portrait samples

Video recording

The handset is capable of recording up to 2160p@30fps videos and up to 720@240fps slow-motion videos. Of course, there is some EIS going on if you go for 1080p@30fps videos but 4K lacks one. Instead, Oppo is offering the Ultra Steady and Ultra Steady Pro video modes for gimbal-like stabilization but we will talk more about that later.

Now, let's take a look at the 4K recording. Colors may look a bit desaturated at first, but they are also closer to real-life. Sharpness is really good, except for the edge softness on the left. There's also some noise in uniform areas. Contrast and dynamic range, on the other hand, are good.

The 1080p video processing is similar but the noise is slightly more apparent.

Video recording using the telephoto and the ultra-wide cameras isn't an option but by tapping on the 2x zoom button, you will be recording a cropped out clip from the main camera in 4K resolution. And the end, the result isn't bad too. Expect the exact same processing as above.

As far as stabilization goes, we already pointed out that EIS doesn't work in 2160p mode as you can see for yourself.

Tapping on the Ultra Steady icon will significantly narrow the field of view because there's some extreme cropping at play here to reduce the shakiness by cutting out the excess from all sides. The Ultra Steady video is recorded using the main 64MP camera and the result is pretty impressive. Aside from the loss in detail, which is something you'd expect, the video looks very good.

There's also a small toggle in the lower-left corner of the viewfinder, which switches to Ultra Steady Pro. You will immediately notice the wider field of view and the different processing - colors are punchier and the contrast is a bit higher. That's because the phone uses the ultra-wide camera for the Ultra Steady Pro mode. Stabilization isn't as good but you may find it more appropriate if you don't need extreme stabilization. Oh, and both Ultra Steady modes are capped at 1080p quality

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